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Happenings at 4.0 Cellars

Carl Hudson
 
May 8, 2019 | Carl Hudson

What does Reserve mean on a wine label?

When a wine is offered for tasting at 4.0 Cellars that includes the word “Reserve” on the label, customers and tasters typically recognize the designation and are curious as to what it means. In the United States, and several other key wine countries (Australia, New Zealand, Chile), the term Reserve has little or no meaning, at least that which is defined. The following explores this issue and will hopefully inform the reader about the term Reserve on a U.S., especially a Texas, wine label.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
April 24, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Aging Wine on the Lees

Recently the question was asked of me, “What are lees, and why do winemakers age wine on the lees?” First of all, lees are essentially dead yeast cells that have already done their job of fermenting sugar in grape juice into alcohol in wine. Once the fermentation process is completed, these dead yeast cells, let’s call them lees from this point on, begin to settle to the bottom of tank or barrel, allowing cloudy wine to become clear over time. Discussed below are several options that the winemaker now has regarding handling lees, and some technical descriptions of what lees actually do for and to a wine.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
April 10, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Pink Wines – Hot in Texas (Update 2019)

Warm weather is the time to enjoy pink wines, and Texas is now producing some of the best available. These pink wines can be dry, off-dry (slightly sweet) or medium-dry (even sweeter) to provide great warm-weather enjoyment for picnics, deck-sitting or lazing about the pool area. And, don’t forget, they can take the place of white wines and many lighter reds at the mealtime table.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
March 28, 2019 | Carl Hudson

4.0 Cellars Wine Club Release – Apr-2019

It is time for another Wine Club Allocation release of delicious 4.0 Cellars wines. Texas springtime weather, as expected, has been weird! We in the Hill Country barely dodged a very damaging cold snap recently that would have damaged a lot of the peach and grape production for 2019. However, reports from growers indicate that damage was minimal. Now we just have to worry about any other bad weather, freezes or hail, over the next month or two.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
March 13, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Frost Protection for Texas Grapes – 2019 Update

In April, 2017, following a trip to the Texas High Plains, Carl’s Corner addressed the topic of protection for grapes from spring frosts and methods available to mitigate freeze damage to young vine tissue and grapes. Texas in general, especially the High Plains, is noted for turbulent and unpredictable weather that often brings frigid temperatures soon after bud break when grapevines are most susceptible to frost damage. Just in the past week or so we have experienced overnight temperatures in the low twenty-degree range here in the Texas Hill Country. This has raised serious concerns for not only grapevines but peach trees, too. Posts on Facebook and Instagram have highlighted these concerns, and just in the past few days limited information has become available about the damage that was or was not observed. More on this part later.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
February 27, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Mourvèdre – Warm Weather Wonder

Mourvèdre (moor-ved), also known as Mataró or Monastrell, is an important grape in the warm, arid regions of Texas. It was back in 2016 when this grape was last discussed on these pages, so it’s time for an update. Mourvèdre is also grown throughout warm weather areas of Europe, especially along the Mediterranean Coast of Spain and France. There are plantings in Australia and other parts of the U.S., but the biggest current impact from Mourvèdre is here in the Lone Star State. Many styles of wine are made from Mourvèdre, ranging from rosés to lighter reds, and from dark, full-bodied reds to port-style wines.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
February 15, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Cinsault Variety Update, 2019

Cinsault (sin-SOH or san-SOH) or Cinsaut (without the “l”) has become an important contributor to the grape variety portfolio of Texas winegrowers and winemakers. Because Cinsault is heat and drought tolerant, it can be grown in most Texas wine regions, especially the Texas High Plains AVA. Cinsault produces relatively large grapes with dark skins which typically translates into medium-bodied, modestly colored red wines with a softer, less tannic character. With its softness, fresh fruit aromas, and spicy flavors, Cinsault is often used to produce easy-drinking rosé wines and as a blending grape with other varieties, like Grenache, Carignan (care-in-yawn), Syrah, and Mourvèdre.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
January 30, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Wine Club February, 2019

Happy New Year! As is typical for this time of the year, Texas weather is weird. One day it is spring, the next is winter, always bringing some confusion as to how to dress for any given activity. Well, there are several activities on the horizon at 4.0 Cellars as February Wine Club Release parties are scheduled for Sundays 3-Feb, 10-Feb, and 17-Feb. If you, as a Wine Club Member, would like to join the party and share time with lots of other club members, check the website (www.fourpointwine.com) and make your reservations. We would love to share your company, and remember that you can enjoy the 30% discount on wine purchases on-site on Club Sundays or online during the week-days in between.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
January 16, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Oak Barrels & Oak Alternatives

Over two years ago, now, a four-part series of Carl’s Corners were posted covering many details of the use of oak barrels in wine production and aging. Since much Texas wine, especially reds, from the 2018 vintage is resting comfortably in oak barrels this winter, it seems a good time for an update on oak and wine.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
 
January 3, 2019 | Carl Hudson

Fortified Port-style Dessert Wines

Those of you who have visited or even driven by 4.0 Cellars probably noticed grape vines growing along Hwy 290, in front of the three Logo tanks at the entrance to the tasting room and patio area. These are Black Spanish, or Lenoir vines, a hybrid grape that grows well in the hot, more humid climates of Texas. The vines were planted in 2013 by folks from Lost Oak Winery, one of our owner/partners, and were intended to be a “show” vineyard, a garden really, so that visitors could see and appreciate grapevines.  Continue »

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