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Carl's Corner

Carl Hudson
April 27, 2017 | Carl Hudson

How Many Calories Are In My Wine?

Calories in wine are often a concern, especially for folks who are watching their calorie intake. Although wines are naturally very low in carbohydrates, calories in wine can come from two sources: 1) ethyl alcohol, the conversion product of sugar in the original grapes (or other fruit) and 2) any residual sugar left in or added to the wine before bottling. In general, dry wines, in which all grape sugar has been fermented to alcohol, tend to have a slightly lower calorie count. Wines that have been sweetened with addition of sugar or fruit syrup tend to have more calories. And, fortified wines with more alcohol, especially those like port which have significant residual sugar, will have the most calories. So, how does one determine how many calories are in that glass of wine.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
April 14, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Frost Protection for Texas Grapes

During a recent trip to the Texas High Plains, a major topic of conversation with grape growers was the concern over spring frosts and the methods available to mitigate freeze damage to young vine tissue and grapes. Texas in general, especially the High Plains, is noted for turbulent and unpredictable weather that often brings frigid temperatures soon after bud break when grapevines are most susceptible to frost damage. Four methods of commonly used frost protection are described below. Please note that none of these are fool-proof, and all are expensive, unfortunately adding cost to Texas grapes, and therefore to Texas wines.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
March 29, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Thoughts on Using a Waiter’s Corkscrew

A recent question and series of replies on Facebook prompted me to write about the use of a standard waiter’s corkscrew when opening a wine. The question that was asked related to whether users tended to pull the cork out of the bottle with the hand on top of the corkscrew handle, versus lifting the cork out with the hand underneath the corkscrew handle. I have a fairly strong opinion on this matter, but there are extenuating circumstances that should be addressed before making a final pronouncement.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
March 1, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Oak Barrels for Wine – Part Four

Oak barrels are most often used for aging wines after the initial fermentation that is usually done in stainless steel tanks or plastic tanks/bins. However, actual fermentation in barrels is also a time-honored process. Chardonnay is the varietal most often fermented in oak. Common characteristics for barrel fermented chardonnay include coconut, cinnamon and cloves, and an overall toasted, silky texture with notes of bread dough, caramel and butter cream. Because of the toasted inner surface of the barrel, the wine will usually be darker gold in color than similar wine fermented in tank. Fermentation of red wines in barrel will bring out a toasty, smokiness with notes of mocha and dark toffee.  Continue »

Time Posted: Mar 1, 2017 at 7:00 AM
Carl Hudson
February 15, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Oak Barrels for Wine – Part Three

Different barrels from different oak sources and cooperages are often called the “winemakers’ spice rack.” From experience, a winemaker learns what barrel types best impart desired aromas and flavors into different varieties and styles of wine. New barrels impart far more flavor into a wine than a used barrel. Typically a new barrel gives up 55-65% of its flavoring components during the first use. Second use can impart 20-35% flavoring while third and fourth use impart 15-25% and 10-15%, respectively. Over time oak flavoring properties are "leached" out of the barrel and less wood flavoring is available for the vintage of wine stored in the barrel.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
February 1, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Oak Barrels for Wine – Part Two

A cooper, or barrel maker, has the time-honored task of creating a liquid tight container (an oak wine barrel) from a pile of wooden staves. The staves are heated, traditionally over an open fire but more frequently now with infrared radiant heaters or steam, until they become pliable. The staves are then bent into the desired shape and bound together with iron rings. The heating process “toasts” the barrel which creates a number of flavor components from wood chemicals and brings them to the surface for eventual contact with the wine. The toasting can be light, medium, medium-plus or heavy, even charred (think Jack Daniels Whiskey barrel). Following the traditional, hand-worked style, a cooper is typically able to construct one-to-two oak barrels per day.  Continue »

Time Posted: Feb 1, 2017 at 7:00 AM
Carl Hudson
January 18, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Oak Barrels for Wine – Part One

Oak is an important winemaking tool that can have significant impact: influencing color, flavor, tannin profile and even the texture of wine. Oak treatment normally occurs when wine is fermented and/or aged in barrels, but increasingly oak alternatives, chips, pellets, staves, etc., are used to add oak influence to wine in other vessels, e.g., stainless steel or plastic tanks.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
January 4, 2017 | Carl Hudson

Decanting Wine – Why and How

Over the holidays, I was asked twice about the slightly mysterious practice of decanting wine and allowing it to “breathe” before consumption. Most wine consumers have heard of this practice, and many have observed it being done to their wine in a restaurant or by someone at an event. The primary reasons for decanting a wine are, 1) to allow a wine’s aromas and flavors to develop more quickly by exposing it to air (oxygen), and 2) to remove most or all of the sediment that some wines, especially older reds, may have developed.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
November 23, 2016 | Carl Hudson

Holiday Wines and the Thanksgiving Feast

Most of us gather with family and friends for a traditional Thanksgiving feast. It is a very special time, and certainly one of the most treasured traditions here in the United States of America. For me, that Thanksgiving feast is accompanied by several special bottles of wine selected to pair with all those amazing food items we tend to serve during the holiday. Here are several recommended selections available at 4.0 Cellars.  Continue »

Carl Hudson
August 31, 2016 | Carl Hudson

How to Keep “Leftover” Wine

What is “leftover” wine? For some, it is hard to imagine such a thing. The best case scenario is not to leave any wine in a bottle. But, if you sometimes find wine left in the bottle(s) after dinner or at evening’s end, what can be done about it?  Continue »

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